5 Reasons All Runners (Or Anyone With Tight Muscles) Should Do Yoga

Yoga requires upper-body strength that running does not. Additionally, poses that require balance strengthen hip and core muscles that protect the lower body from misalignment and injury. 

So now that you know why you should do it, here’s how to make your yoga habit actually happen. 

Start slowly.

If you’re a total noob, begin by trying out a few key poses like pigeon, revolved low lunge, and legs up the wall at home. Supplement with a five-minute meditation to build focus and mindfulness—several apps offer guided options. 

Sample the offerings. 

You can take an in-person class—if you’re starting out, choose one marked for beginners—or try one of the many routines offered online. If you don’t love a style or instructor, keep searching until you find your match. 

Chill out. 

Yoga isn’t a race, so don’t try to compete with your classmates. Focus on what you’re doing, and ignore everyone else—except the instructor, who can ensure you’re doing the poses correctly. When in doubt, opt for a shallower stretch—you don’t want to hurt yourself. 

Avoid overdoing it. 

You can do restorative yoga pretty much whenever you want, but avoid power or advanced varieties the day before a hard or long running workout or race. 

Adapted and reprinted from How To Make Yourself Poop: And 999 Other Tips All Runners Should Know, by Meghan Kita. How To Make Yourself Poop: And 999 Other Tips All Runners Should Know is available wherever books and e-books are sold.

This content was originally published here.

Piinch is balance. We will never know what it would mean to be anyone but ourselves. All we can ever do is balance our needs with those around us and the needs of nature. Information, knowledge, inspiration. This is why the Piinch Network exists.

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